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IELTS Reading: Seven common questions

IELTS Reading: Seven common questions

 

You may have read one of our posts about nine commonly asked questions for the Listening module. In this post, I am going to discuss some common questions candidates have asked us about the Reading module.

1. What if I don’t know about the topics in the reading passages?
The topics in IELTS are of general interest and come from books, magazines, newspapers, journals and so on. They will not be so difficult or technical that an educated person can’t understand them. It is sensible to spend some time reading the kind of text you are going to see in the test — especially if you are not familiar with Western culture.

2. How many different types of question are there?
There is a whole range of question types, including multiple choice, short-answer questions, sentence completion, table completion, yes/no/not given, classification and others. Confused? If so, you really need to find out more about these task types. Some of them can be difficult — especially Yes/No/Not given. If you don’t understand these task types before you go into the examination hall, you are very unlikely to do well in IELTS. Start by going here

3. Should I start by skimming through the passages?
Skimming and scanning skills are important in the Reading test, but it may be better to read the questions first. One thing is always true — the questions are easier to understand than the passages themselves. By quickly looking at the questions (it won’t take more than 45 seconds), you can  get an idea on what to look for in the text, which will save time later.

4. Do I have extra time at the end to transfer my answers to the answer paper?
No. In the Listening module, you are given time at the end to transfer your answers, but not in the Reading module. You need to write your answers on the answer paper as you work through each section.

5. Should I spend the same amount of time on each section?
If you are aiming for a high band score (above 7), it’s a mistake to spend the same amount of time on Section 1 and Section 3. The going gets a lot tougher in the last section and a lot more attention to detail is required than in the previous passages. If you aim high, you have got to be confident enough to go through the first section quickly as it tends to be more straightforward. Judging from my own experience, 8-10 minutes would be the maximum time you should spend on your first run on Section 1.

6. Do I get more marks for correct answers in Section 3?
No. There is a total of 40 questions, and there is one mark for each question, no matter which section it is in.

7. If I get an answer wrong, do I lose a mark?
No. You will not have a mark deducted, you will simply fail to gain one. This means that if you are not sure of the answer, there is nothing to lose by guessing. Who knows, you might get it right!

4 comments

  1. kiranjitkaur says:

    I have a main problem in reading …i have already give exam for twice … but reading score remained same in both test ..5…. so im working on it …but it cant be improving

    • anita says:

      reading is not that difficult c first of all chunk timing as u have to finish one section in 20 minutes then you give 5 minutes for glancing during that try to make note just beside every paragraph them of that particular pragraph
      that note could be of single word like likewise
      then start scanning better to to attempt first the most difficult question for u it will work as scanning tool
      break your question in its key words maximum 3 and now it would be easy for you to relate them with particular paragraphs
      now try to trace those key words in that related paragraph where you get minimum two of then means there will be your answer”s maximum possibility is there
      initially it may seem you more time consuming but as your no of practices will be more u will start feeling smooth

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