Home » Writing

IELTS Writing: Better vocabulary, better band score

Bryan Dowie explains why a better vocabulary will result in a better band score in IELTS Writing, and offers some practical tips and exercises.

Bryan Dowie, IELTS teacher, Hong Kong

IELTS Writing: How important is spelling?

In this post, Peter Hare focuses on three areas candidates commonly lose marks in IELTS Writing — word count, spelling and punctuation.

Peter Hare, Manager, British Council Ethiopia

IELTS Writing: The four keys to success

The first thing you should know before going into your IELTS Writing test is what the examiner is looking for. Take a look at the four keys to success.

Bryan Dowie, IELTS teacher, Hong Kong

IELTS Writing: Boost your score by reading

‘Reading and writing cannot be separated from each other: the more in-depth reading you do, the more in-depth writing you will eventually do.’ The University of Washington points to a clear link between reading and writing. Reading exposes you to different styles; it shows you how grammar is used correctly; and it helps you to build vocabulary and use it accurately. As the IELTS Writing paper has been referred to as the most difficult paper, all of these skills can help to improve the way you write. But to get the maximum benefit for your IELTS Writing test, and boost your band score, you need to use reading as a … Read more

Andrew Stokes, IELTS specialist, ClarityEnglish

IELTS Writing: the problems with too many words

For some candidates, it’s very tempting to write as much as they can in the one hour given in the Writing section — they want to really showcase their range of vocabulary and their ability to write long sentences. But do long essays really get you a better band score?

Sieon Lau, Senior Editor, ClarityEnglish

IELTS Writing: The most difficult paper?

It’s difficult to go seriously wrong with the Reading and Listening tests in IELTS. Even if you have trouble understanding the text or the audio, the question paper gives you a pretty clear idea of what you need to write. And if you’re not sure, you can always guess. With the Speaking test, you’ll answer a series of questions, so even if you make a mistake with one of them, you’ll get another chance with the next question. Writing Task 2 is different — If you fail to understand the question, and go off on the wrong track, you could score no marks at all. And that could mean missing … Read more

Andrew Stokes, IELTS specialist, ClarityEnglish